United States Nonimmigrant (Temporary) Workers

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United States Nonimmigrant (Temporary) Workers

Your potential employer must generally file a nonimmigrant petition on your behalf with USCIS for you to travel to the United States legally as a nonimmigrant to work temporarily in the United States.

Dependent Nonimmigrant Classification for Spouses and Children

outside the United States and eligible for the dependent nonimmigrant categorization, a temporary worker should apply for a visa immediately at a U.S. consulate.

Form I-539, Application to Extend/Change Nonimmigrant Status, must be filed by spouses and children seeking a status change or an extended stay in a dependent nonimmigrant classification. For more information on how to file this application, please check the instructions for Form I-539.

Federal Tax Information in the United States

Immigrants who work in the United States may owe taxes to the United States. For more information, go to the Internal Revenue Service’s (IRS) website and look up “Taxation of Nonresident Aliens.”

1. Only a few nonimmigrant classes allow you to work in the United States without first having a petition submitted on your behalf by an employer. Nonimmigrant E-1, E-2, E-3, and TN classifications, as well as F-1 and M-1 student and J-1 exchange visitor classifications in some cases, are examples of such classifications.

2. On December 20, 2009, the H-1C nonimmigrant visa classification expired.

3. Dependent spouses in the E and L categories are eligible to apply for work authorization.

4. Despite the fact the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA) does not offer a specific nonimmigrant classification for dependents of Q-1 nonimmigrants, but this does not prevent a Q-1’s spouse or the kid from entering the United States under a different nonimmigrant classification.

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Author Since: February 1, 2021

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